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Mon, 08 Mar 2010
Edward Capern has joined Oranges and Lemons to tell you about "The Bonnie May."

Edward CapernFROM ORANGES AND LEMONS
EDWARD CAPERN
(January 21, 1819 June 5, 1894),

He was born at Tiverton, Devonshire, he was an English poet.

 From an early age he worked in a lace factory. His failing eyesight forced him to abandon this occupation in 1847 and he was in dire distress until he secured an appointment to be "the Rural Postman of Bideford," by which name he is usually known.

He occupied his leisure in writing occasional poetry which struck the popular fancy. Collected in a volume and published by subscription in 1856, it received the warm praise of the reviews and many distinguished people.

This is one of his poems that was used in the "Boys' Third Standard," and it was published in 1873 though I am not sure of the exact date the poem was written, it is called;

Nice to have some real May Queens

THE BONNIE MAY.

HERE she comes, the bonnie May,
Sportive as a lamb at play,
Beauteous as in days of yore,
Welcome to the rich and poor;
Nought is gloomy, sad, or drear,
All is gladness everywhere.
Village lads are up betimes,
Waiting not for morning chimes,
Leaving each his humble home,
O'er the fresh green fields to roam.

See them one by one return,
Raptures in their bright eyes burn,
As the branch is borne along
To the tune of ancient song,
This the burthen of their lay,
"Here she comes, the First of May."

Now their little hands begin,
Mid the shouts and merry din,
Pretty wreaths and floral strings
For their May-day offerings.

Round the Maypole, round and round,
Men, and maids, and children bound ;
Show'ring, as they halt between,
Honours on their May-day Queen ;
E'en the hamlet's oldest men
Laugh, and feel they're young again,
Shouting as each chaplet swings,
Till the very welkin rings.
Sadness hath no song for her,
May 's the merriest of the year.

ROUND THE MAYPOLE, ROUND AND ROUND

Dancing
round the Maypole

Posted 13:27

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