Homepage One
Angels A - Z
Charlies Circus
Childrens Hour
Counting Rhymes
Country Rhymes
Creepy Tales
Dexter Dragon
Dragons n Troll
Diddilys Choice
Dream Baby
Elfin Magic
Fairy Fiona
Fairyland
FamilyFavourite
Family Fun Time
Fingles Wood 1
Fingles Wood 2
Fingles Wood 3
Flora Fairy
Fun Cooking
Games Time
Googlenoks JIC
Gold n Silver
Googlenoks SDS
HeyDiddleDiddle
Jack N Jill
Josh n Jokes
Little BoPeep
Magic
Mary - Mary
Mary's Dilemma
Nowhere Land
NurseryRhymes
Over theRainbow
Orange n Lemon
Pastimes 4 U
Pastimes 4 U 2
Pooh Corner
Rhymes n Rhythm
RiddlemeeRee
Ring-O-Roses
Sara's World
Sandy Bramble
Shadwell's Day
Shaggy the Dog
SheenaStorybook
Smiling Eyes
Smiling Simon
Struwwel!Peter
Studio Ghibli
Sunday Stories
Tapestry
The Goblin's
The Young Ones
Tilly Teapot
Toby Bucket
Trudi's Titbits
Blogs
Photo's
Seligor's Castle, fun for all the children of the world.
Blogs
Subscribe: Add to Google Add to My Yahoo! Subscribe in NewsGator Online Add to My AOL


Thu, 15 Mar 2012
Three Wishes Told to You in Two Different Ways. xxx

THE YOUNG ONES

riding on a donkey

 The Three Wishes.

Three girls sat idly on the beach ;

   One like a lily, tall and fair;

                                   One brilliant with her raven hair ;

                                                  One sweet and shy of speech.

"I wish for fame," the lily said,

                         "And I for wealth and courtly life,"

                                               Then gently spoke the third "as wife, 

                                        I ask for love instead."

Years passed. Again beside the sea.

                           Three women sat with whitened hair,

                                      Still graceful, lovable, and fair,

                                     And told their destiny.

"Fame is not all," the lily sighed ;

                       "Wealth futile if the heart be dead."

                                               "I have been loved," one sweetly said,

                                 And I am satisfied."

Ladies

The Three Wishes - A Story

                    ONCE upon a time, and be sure 'twas a long time ago, there lived a poor woodman in a great forest, and every day of his life he went out to fell timber. So one day he started out, and the goodwife filled his wallet and slung his bottle on his back, that he might have meat and drink in the forest. He had marked out a huge old oak, which, thought he, would furnish many and many a good plank. And when he was come to it, he took his axe in his hand and swung it round his head as though he were minded to fell the tree at one stroke. But he hadn't given one blow, when what should he hear but the pitifullest entreating, and there stood before him a fairy who prayed and beseeched him to spare the tree. He was dazed, as you may fancy, with wonderment and affright, and he couldn't open his mouth to utter a word. But he found his tongue at last, and, 'Well,' said he, 'I'll e'en do as thou wishest.'

                   'You've done better for yourself than you know,' answered the fairy, 'and to show I'm not ungrateful, I'll grant you your next three wishes, be they what they may.' And therewith the fairy was no more to be seen, and the woodman slung his wallet over his shoulder and his bottle at his side, and off he started home.

                   But the way was long, and the poor man was regularly dazed with the wonderful thing that had befallen him, and when he got home there was nothing in his noddle but the wish to sit down and rest. Maybe, too, 'twas a trick of the fairy's. Who can tell? Anyhow, down he sat by the blazing fire, and as he sat he waxed hungry, though it was a long way off supper-time yet.

'Hasn't thou naught for supper, dame?' said he to his wife.

'Nay, not for a couple of hours yet,' said she.

'Ah!' groaned the woodman, 'I wish I'd a good link of black pudding here before me.'

No sooner had he said the word, when clatter, clatter, rustle, rustle, what should come down the chimney but a link of the finest black pudding the heart of man could wish for.

If the woodman stared, the goodwife stared three times as much. 'What's all this?' says she.

              Then all the morning's work came back to the woodman, and he told his tale right out, from beginning to end, and as he told it the goodwife glowered and glowered, and when he had made an end of it she burst out, 'Thou bee'st but a fool, Jan, thou bee'st but a fool; and I wish the pudding were at thy nose, I do indeed.'

       And before you could say Jack Robinson, there the Goodman sat and his nose was the longer for a noble link of black pudding.

     He gave a pull, but it stuck, and she gave a pull, but it stuck, and they both pulled till they had nigh pulled the nose off, but it stuck and stuck.

    'What's to be done now?' said he.

    "Tisn't so very unsightly,' said she, looking hard at him.

                 Then the woodman saw that if he wished, he must need wish in a hurry; and wish he did, that the black pudding might come off his nose. Well! there it lay in a dish on the table, and if the goodman and goodwife didn't ride in a golden coach, or dress in silk and satin, why, they had at least as fine a black pudding for their supper as the heart of man could desire.

Posted 13:46

No comments


Post a Comment:




site  zoomshare